classname-variants

Stitches-like variant API for plain class names.

The library is framework agnostic and can be used with any kind of CSS flavor.

It is especially useful though if used with Tailwind and React, as it provides some dedicated helpers and even allows for a styled-components like API, but with class names instead of styles!

Edit classname-variants/react

Basics

Let’s aussume we want to build a button component with Tailwind CSS that comes in different sizes and colors.

It consists of some base classes that are always present as well as some optional classes that need to be added depending on the desired variants.

const button = variants({
  base: "rounded text-white",
  variants: {
    color: {
      brand: "bg-sky-500",
      accent: "bg-teal-500",
    },
    size: {
      small: "px-5 py-3 text-xs",
      large: "px-6 py-4 text-base",
    },
  },
});

The result is a function that expects an object which specifies what variants should be selected. When called, it returns a string containing the respective class names:

document.write(`
  <button class="${button({
    color: "accent",
    size: "large",
  })}">
    Click Me!
  </button>
`);

Advanced Usage

Boolean variants

Variants can be of type boolean by using "true" as the key:

const button = variants({
  base: "text-white",
  variants: {
    rounded: {
      true: "rounded-full",
    },
  },
});

Compound variants

The compoundVariants option can be used to apply class names based on a combination of other variants.

const button = variants({
  variants: {
    color: {
      neutral: "bg-gray-200",
      accent: "bg-teal-400",
    },
    outlined: {
      true: "border-2",
    },
  },
  compoundVariants: [
    {
      variants: {
        color: "accent",
        outlined: true,
      },
      className: "border-teal-500",
    },
  ],
});

Default variants

The defaultVariants option can be used to select a variant by default:

const button = variants({
  variants: {
    color: {
      neutral: "bg-gray-200",
      accent: "bg-teal-400",
    },
  },
  defaultVariants: {
    color: "neutral",
  },
});

React

The library contains utility functions that are useful for writing React components.

It works much like variants() but instead of a class name string, the resulting function returns an object with props.

import { variantProps } from "classname-variants/react";

const buttonProps = variantProps({
  base: "rounded-md text-white",
  variants: {
    color: {
      brand: "bg-sky-500",
      accent: "bg-teal-500",
    },
    size: {
      small: "px-5 py-3 text-xs",
      large: "px-6 py-4 text-base",
    },
    rounded: {
      true: "rounded-full",
    },
  },
  defaultVariants: {
    color: "brand",
  },
});

This way a compontents’ props (or part of them) can be directly spread into the target element. All variant-related props are used to construct the className property while all other props are passed through verbatim:

type Props = SX.IntrinsicElements["button"] &
  VariantPropsOf<typeof buttonProps>;

function Button(props: Props) {
  return <button {...buttonProps(props)} />;
}

function App() {
  return (
    <Button size="small" color="accent" onClick={console.log}>
      Click Me!
    </Button>
  );
}

Bonus: styled-components, but with class names 💅

Things can be taken even a step further, resulting in a styled-components like way of defining reusable components:

import { styled } from "classname-variants/react";

const Button = styled("button", {
  variants: {
    size: {
      small: "text-xs",
      large: "text-base",
    },
  },
});

You can also style other custom React components as long as the accept a className prop.

Tailwind IntelliSense

In order to get auto-completion for the CSS classes themselves, you can use the Tailwind CSS IntelliSense plugin for VS Code. In order to make it recognize the strings inside your variants config, you have to somehow mark them and configure the plugin accordingly.

One way of doing so is by using tagged template literals:

const tw = String.raw;

const button = variants({
  base: tw`px-5 py-2 text-white`,
  variants: {
    color: {
      neutral: tw`bg-slate-500 hover:bg-slate-400`,
      accent: tw`bg-teal-500 hover:bg-teal-400`,
    },
  },
});

const tw = String.raw;

const button = variants({
  base: tw.px(5).py(2).text.white,
  variants: {
    color: {
      neutral: tw.bg.slate(500).hover(tw.bg.slate.400),
      accent: tw.bg.teal(500).hover(tw.bg.teal(400)),
    },
  },
});

You can then add the following line to your settings.json:

"tailwindCSS.experimental.classRegex": ["tw`(.+?)`"]

In order to get type coverage even for your Tailwind classes you can use a tool like tailwind-ts.

License

MIT