/ Chart

A react library for building node-based graphs

A react library for building node-based graphs

React Flow

React Flow is a library for building node-based graphs. You can easily implement custom node types and it comes with components like a mini-map and graph controls.

Key Features

  • Easy to use: Seamless zooming & panning behaviour and single and multi-selections of elements
  • Customizable: Different node and edge types and support for custom nodes with multiple handles and custom edges
  • Fast rendering: Only nodes that have changed are re-rendered and only those that are in the viewport are displayed
  • Utils: Snap-to-grid and graph helper functions
  • Components: Background, Minimap and Controls
  • Reliable: Written in Typescript and tested with cypress

In order to make this library as flexible as possible we don’t do any state updates besides the positions. This means that you need to pass the functions to remove an element or connect nodes by yourself. You can implement your own ones or use the helper functions that come with the library.

Installation

npm install react-flow-renderer

Usage

This is a very basic example of how to use React Flow. There are more advanced examples in the example folder.

import React from 'react';
import ReactFlow from 'react-flow-renderer';

const elements = [
  { id: '1', data: { label: 'Node 1' }, position: { x: 250, y: 5 } },
  // you can also pass a React component as a label
  { id: '2', data: { label: <div>Node 2</div> }, position: { x: 100, y: 100 } },
  { id: 'e1-2', source: '1', target: '2', animated: true },
];

const BasicFlow = () => <ReactFlow elements={elements} />;

React Flow Component Prop Types

Basic Props

  • elements: array of nodes and edges (required)
  • style: css properties
  • className: additional class name

Flow View

  • minZoom: default: 0.5
  • maxZoom: default: 2
  • defaultZoom: default: 1
  • defaultPosition: default: [0, 0]
  • snapToGrid: default: false
  • snapGrid: [x, y] array - default: [16, 16]
  • onlyRenderVisibleNodes: default: true
  • translateExtent: default [[-∞, -∞], [+∞, +∞]]

Event Handlers

  • onElementClick(event: MouseEvent, element: Node | Edge): called when user clicks node or edge
  • onElementsRemove(elements: Elements): called when user removes node or edge
  • onNodeDragStart(event: MouseEvent, node: Node): node drag start
  • onNodeDragStop(event: MouseEvent, node: Node): node drag stop
  • onNodeMouseEnter(event: MouseEvent, node: Node): node mouse enter
  • onNodeMouseMove(event: MouseEvent, node: Node): node mouse move
  • onNodeMouseLeave(event: MouseEvent, node: Node): node mouse leave
  • onNodeContextMenu(event: MouseEvent, node: Node): node context menu
  • onConnect({ source, target }): called when user connects two nodes
  • onConnectStart(event: MouseEvent, { nodeId, handleType }): called when user starts to drag connection line
  • onConnectStop(event: MouseEvent): called when user stops to drag connection line
  • onConnectEnd(event: MouseEvent): called after user stops or connects nodes
  • onLoad(reactFlowInstance): called after flow is initialized
  • onMove(flowTransform: FlowTransform): called when user is panning or zooming
  • onMoveStart(flowTransform: FlowTransform): called when user starts panning or zooming
  • onMoveEnd(flowTransform: FlowTransform): called when user ends panning or zooming
  • onSelectionChange(elements: Elements): called when user selects one or multiple elements
  • onSelectionDragStart(evt: MouseEvent, nodes: Node[]): called when user starts to drag a selection
  • onSelectionDrag(evt: MouseEvent, nodes: Node[]): called when user drags a selection
  • onSelectionDragStop(evt: MouseEvent, nodes: Node[]): called when user stops to drag a selection
  • onSelectionContextMenu(event: MouseEvent, nodes: Node[]): called when user does a right-click on a selection
  • onPaneClick(event: MouseEvent): called when user clicks directly on the canvas
  • onPaneContextMenu(event: MouseEvent): called when user does a right-click on the canvas
  • onPaneScroll(event: WheelEvent): called when user scrolls pane (only works when zoomOnScroll is set to `false)

Interaction

  • nodesDraggable: default: true. This applies to all nodes. You can also change the behavior of a specific node with the draggable node option
  • nodesConnectable: default: true. This applies to all nodes. You can also change the behavior of a specific node with the connectable node option
  • elementsSelectable: default: true. This applies to all elements. You can also change the behavior of a specific node with the selectable node option
  • zoomOnScroll: default: true
  • zoomOnDoubleClick: default: true
  • selectNodesOnDrag: default: true
  • paneMoveable: default: true - If set to false, panning and zooming is disabled

Element Customization

Connection Line Options

  • connectionLineType: connection line type = default (bezier), straight, step, smoothstep
  • connectionLineStyle: connection style as svg attributes
  • connectionLineComponent: custom connection line component

Keys

  • deleteKeyCode: default: 8 (delete)
  • selectionKeyCode: default: 16 (shift)

React Flow Instance

You can receive a reactFlowInstance by using the onLoad callback:

import React from 'react';
import ReactFlow from 'react-flow-renderer';

const onLoad = (reactFlowInstance) => {
  reactFlowInstance.fitView();
}

const BasicFlow = () => <ReactFlow onLoad={onLoad} elements={[]} />;

reactFlowInstance has the following functions:

project

Transforms pixel coordinates to the internal ReactFlow coordinate system.
This can be used when you drag nodes (from a side bar for example) and need the position on the pane.

project = (position: XYPosition): XYPosition

fitView

Fits view port so that all nodes are inside the view port.

fitView = ({ padding }): void

zoomIn

zoomIn = (): void

zoomOut

zoomOut = (): void

zoomTo

zoomTo = (zoomLevel: number): void

getElements

getElements = (): Elements

setTransform

Sets position and zoom of the pane.

setTransform = (transform: FlowTransform): void

Nodes

There are three different node types (default, input, output) you can use. The node types differ in the number and types of handles. An input node has only a source handle, a default node has a source and a target and an output node has only a target handle. You create nodes by adding them to the elements array of the ReactFlow component.

Node example: { id: '1', type: 'input', data: { label: 'Node 1' }, position: { x: 250, y: 5 } }

Options

  • id: string (required)
  • position: { x: number, y: number } (required)
  • data: {} (required if you are using a standard type, otherwise depends on your implementation)
  • type: 'input' | 'output' | 'default' or a custom one you implemented
  • style: css properties
  • className: additional class name
  • targetPosition: 'left' | 'right' | 'top' | 'bottom' handle position - default: 'top'
  • sourcePosition: 'left' | 'right' | 'top' | 'bottom' handle position - default: 'bottom'
  • isHidden: if true, the node will not be rendered
  • draggable: boolean - if option is not set, the node is draggable (overwrites general nodesDraggable option)
  • connectable: boolean - if option is not set, the node is connectable (overwrites general nodesConnectable option)
  • selectable: boolean - if option is not set, the node is selectable (overwrites general elementsSelectable option)

Node Types & Custom Nodes

The standard node types are input, default and output. The default node types object looks like this:

{
  input: InputNode,
  default: DefaultNode,
  output: OutputNode
}

The keys represent the type names and the values are the components that get rendered.
If you want to introduce a new type you can pass a nodeTypes object to the ReactFlow component:

nodeTypes={{
  special: MyCustomNode
}}

You can now use the type special for a node.
The default, input and output types would be still available except you overwrote one of them.
There is an example of a custom node implementation in the custom node example.

Custom Node Props

Your custom nodes are wrapped so that the basic functions like dragging or selecting work. Custom nodes receive the following props:

  • id: string
  • data: object
  • type: string
  • selected: boolean
  • sourcePosition: string
  • targetPosition: string

Prevent dragging

If you have controls or other elements inside your custom node that should not drag the node you can add the class name nodrag.

Handle Component

We export a Handle component as a helper for your custom nodes:

import { Handle } from 'react-flow-renderer';

const targetHandleWithValidation = (
  <Handle
    type="target"
    position="left"
    isValidConnection={(connection) => connection.source === 'some-id'}
    onConnect={params => console.log('handle onConnect', params)}
    style={{ background: '#fff' }}
  />
);

Prop Types

  • type: 'source' or 'target'
  • id: string - you only need this when you have multiple source or target handles (otherwise the node id is used)
  • position: 'left', 'right', 'top' or 'bottom' handle position - default: 'top' for type target, 'bottom' for type source
  • onConnect: function that gets triggered on connect
  • isValidConnection: function receives a connection { target: 'some-id', source: 'another-id' } as param, returns a boolean - default: true
  • style: css properties
  • className: additional class name

Validation

The handle receives the additional class names connecting when the connection line is above the handle and valid if the connection is valid. You can find an example which uses these classes here.

Multiple Handles

If you need multiple source or target handles you can achieve this by creating a custom node. Normally you just use the id of a node for the source or target of an edge. If you have multiple source or target handles you need to pass an id to these handles. These ids get then added to the node id, so that you can connect a specific handle. If you have a node with an id = 1 and a handle with an id = a you can connect this handle by using the id = 1__a.
You can find an example of how to implement a custom node with multiple handles in the custom node example.

Edges

React Flow comes with four edge types (default, straight, step, smoothstep). As the names indicate, the edges differ in the representation. The default type is a bezier edge. You create edges by adding them to your elements array of the ReactFlow component.

Edge example: { id: 'e1-2', type: 'straight', source: '1', target: '2', animated: true, label: 'edge label' }

If you wanted to display this edge, you would need a node with id = 1 (source node) and another one with id = 2 (target node).

Options

  • id: string (required)
  • source: string (an id of a node) (required)
  • target: string (an id of a node) (required)
  • type: 'default' (bezier), 'straight', 'step' and 'smoothedge' or a custom one depending on your implementation
  • animated: boolean
  • style: css properties for the edge line path
  • className: additional class name
  • label: string
  • labelStyle: css properties for the text
  • labelShowBg: boolean - default: true
  • labelBgStyle: css properties for the text background
  • labelBgPadding: [number, number] background rectangle padding - default: [2, 4]
  • labelBgBorderRadius: number - default 2
  • arrowHeadType: 'arrow' or 'arrowclosed' - defines the arrowhead of the edge
  • markerEndId: custom marker end url - if this is used arrowHeadType gets ignored
  • isHidden: if true, the edge will not be rendered
  • data: {} you can use this to pass data to your custom edges.

You can find an example with different edges in the edges example.

Edge Types & Custom Edges

The basic edge types are default (bezier), straight, step and smoothstep. The default edgeTypes object looks like this:

{
  default: BezierEdge,
  straight: StraightEdge,
  step: StepEdge,
  smoothstep: SmoothStepEdge
}

The keys represent the type names and the values are the edge components.
If you want to introduce a new edge type you can pass an edgeTypes object to the ReactFlow component:

edgeTypes={{
  special: MyCustomEdge
}}

Now you could use the new type special for an edge.
The straight, default and step types would still be available unless you overwrote one of them.
There is an implementation of a custom edge in the edges example.

Edge Utils

There are several utils that help you to create a custom edge. They are used in the custom edge example.

getBezierPath

Returns the path of a bezier edge.

getBezierPath({ sourceX, sourceY, sourcePosition = Position.Bottom, targetX, targetY, targetPosition = Position.Top, }: GetBezierPathParams): string

getSmoothStepPath

Returns the path of a smooth step edge. You can set borderRadius = 0 to get a step edge path.

getSmoothStepPath({ sourceX, sourceY, sourcePosition = Position.Bottom, targetX, targetY, targetPosition = Position.Top, borderRadius = 5, }: GetSmoothStepPathParams): string

getEdgeCenter

Returns the center poostion [centerX, centerY] of the edge.

getEdgeCenter({ sourceX, sourceY, targetX, targetY }: GetCenterParams): [number, number, number, number]

getMarkerEnd

Returns the marker end url for displaying the arrow head.

getMarkerEnd(arrowHeadType?: ArrowHeadType, markerEndId?: string): string

Components

Background

React Flow comes with two background variants: dots and lines. You can use it by passing it as a children to the ReactFlow component:

import ReactFlow, { Background } from 'react-flow-renderer';

const FlowWithBackground = () => (
  <ReactFlow elements={elements}>
    <Background
      variant="dots"
      gap={12}
      size={4}
    />
  </ReactFlow>
);

Prop Types

  • variant: string - has to be 'dots' or 'lines' - default: dots
  • gap: number - the gap between the dots or lines - default: 16
  • size: number - the radius of the dots or the stroke width of the lines - default: 0.5
  • color: string - the color of the dots or lines - default: #999 for dots, #eee for lines
  • style: css properties
  • className: additional class name

MiniMap

You can use the mini map plugin by passing it as a children to the ReactFlow component:

import ReactFlow, { MiniMap } from 'react-flow-renderer';

const FlowWithMiniMap = () => (
  <ReactFlow elements={elements}>
    <MiniMap
      nodeColor={(node) => {
        switch (node.type) {
          case 'input': return 'red';
          case 'default': return '#00ff00';
          case 'output': return 'rgb(0,0,255)';
          default: return '#eee';
        }
      }}
    />
  </ReactFlow>
);

Prop Types

  • nodeColor: string or function - If you pass a color as a string all nodes will get that color. If you pass a function you can return a color depending on the passed node.
  • nodeBorderRadius: number
  • nodeClassName: string or function for adding an additional class to the nodes inside the mini map
  • maskColor: string
  • style: css properties
  • className: additional class name

Controls

The control panel contains a zoom-in, zoom-out, fit-view and a lock/unlock button. You can use it by passing it as a children to the ReactFlow component:

import ReactFlow, { Controls } from 'react-flow-renderer';

const FlowWithControls = () => (
  <ReactFlow elements={elements}>
    <Controls />
  </ReactFlow>
);

Prop Types

  • showZoom: boolean - default: true
  • showFitView: boolean - default: true
  • showInteractive: boolean - default: true
  • style: css properties
  • className: additional class name

ReactFlowProvider

If you need access to the internal state and action of React Flow outside of the ReactFlow component you can wrap it with the ReactFlowProvider component:

import ReactFlow, { ReactFlowProvider } from 'react-flow-renderer';

const FlowWithOwnProvider = () => (
  <ReactFlowProvider>
    <ReactFlow
      elements={elements}
      onElementClick={onElementClick}
      onConnect={onConnect}
    />
  </ReactFlowProvider>
);

It is used in the provider example.

Styling

There are two ways how you can style the graph pane and the elements.
You can create your own CSS rules or pass style properties to the components.

Using Class Names

Since we are rendering DOM nodes you can simply overwrite the styles with your own CSS rules.
The React Flow wrapper has the className react-flow. If you want to change the graph background for example you can do:

.react-flow {
  background: red;
}

Used Class Names

  • .react-flow - Outer container
  • .react-flow__renderer - Inner container
  • .react-flow__zoompane - Zoom & pan pane
  • .react-flow__selectionpane - Selection pane
  • .react-flow__selection - User selection
  • .react-flow__edges - Edges wrapper
  • .react-flow__edge - Edge element
    • .selected is added when edge is selected
    • .animated is added when edge is animated
  • .react-flow__edge-path - Edge element path
  • .react-flow__edge-text - Edge text
  • .react-flow__edge-textbg - Edge text background
  • .react-flow__connection - Connection line
  • .react-flow__connection-path - Connection line path
  • .react-flow__nodes - Nodes wrapper
  • .react-flow__node - Node element
    • .selected is added when edge is selected
    • -${type} is added (.react-flow__node-default, .react-flow__node-input, .react-flow__node-output)
  • .react-flow__nodesselection - Nodes selection
  • .react-flow__nodesselection-rect - Nodes selection rect
  • .react-flow__handle - Handle component
    • .react-flow__handle-bottom is added when position = 'bottom'
    • .react-flow__handle-top is added when position = 'top'
    • .react-flow__handle-left is added when position = 'left'
    • .react-flow__handle-right is added when position = 'right'
    • .react-flow__handle-connecting is added when connection line is above a handle
    • .react-flow__handle-valid is added when connection line is above a handle and the connection is valid
  • .react-flow__background - Background component
  • .react-flow__minimap - Mini map component
  • .react-flow__controls - Controls component

Using Properties

You could achieve the same effect by passing a style prop to the ReactFlow component:

const style = { background: 'red', width: '100%' height: '300px' };

const FlowWithRedBg = (
  <ReactFlow
    elements={elements}
    style={style}
  />
);

Helper Functions

If you want to remove a node or connect two nodes with each other you need to pass a function to onElementsRemove and onConnect. In order to simplify this process there are some helper functions you can use:

import ReactFlow, { isNode, isEdge, removeElements, addEdge } from 'react-flow-renderer';

isEdge

Returns true if the passed element is an edge.

isEdge = (element: Node | Edge): element is Edge

isNode

Returns true if the passed element is a node.

isNode = (element: Node | Edge): element is Node

removeElements

Returns an array of elements without the ones from elementsToRemove. It also removes all incoming/outgoing edges if you just pass one or multiple nodes.

removeElements = (elementsToRemove: Elements, elements: Elements): Elements

addEdge

Returns an array with elements with the added edge.

addEdge = (edgeParams: Edge, elements: Elements): Elements

getOutgoers

Returns all direct child nodes of the passed node.

getOutgoers = (node: Node, elements: Elements): Node[]

getIncomers

Returns all direct incoming nodes of the passed node.

getIncomers = (node: Node, elements: Elements): Node[]

getConnectedEdges

Returns all edges that are connected to the passed nodes.

getConnectedEdges = (nodes: Node[], edges: Edge[]): Edge[]

You can use these function as seen in this example or use your own ones.

Access Internal State and Actions

Under the hood React Flow uses Easy Peasy for state handling.
If you need to access the internal state you can use the useStoreState hook inside a child component of the ReactFlow component:

import ReactFlow, { useStoreState } from 'react-flow-renderer';

const NodesDebugger = () => {
  const nodes = useStoreState(state => state.nodes);

  console.log(nodes);

  return null;
}

const Flow = () => (
  <ReactFlow elements={elements}>
    <NodesDebugger />
  </ReactFlow>
);

You will not need this in most cases but you can also use the internal actions that are defined in the store:

import React, { useEffect } from 'react';
import { useStoreActions } from 'react-flow-renderer'

const TransformUpdater = ({ x, y, zoom }) => {
  const setTransform = useStoreActions(actions => actions.setInitTransform);

  useEffect(() => {
    setTransform({ x, y, k: zoom })
  }, [x, y, zoom])
});

If you need more control you can wrap the ReactFlow component with the ReactFlowProvider component in order to be able to call useStoreState and useStoreActions outside of the ReactFlow component.

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