/ Message

Enhance formatted messages for react-intl

Enhance formatted messages for react-intl

react-intl-enhanced-message

Enhance formatted messages as rich text with react-intl.

Installation

yarn add react-intl-enhanced-message

Following peer depepencies are required to be installed in your app:

  • react >= 16.3.2
  • react-intl >= 2.0.0

👉 Note:

If you need this to be picked up by babel-plugin-react-intl I suggest to install the fork @allthings/babel-plugin-react-intl as the original seems not to be maintained anymore.

With this you can use it like:

.babelrc

{
  "plugins": [
    ["@allthings/babel-plugin-react-intl", {
      "additionalComponentNames": {
        "react-intl-enhanced-message": ["FormattedEnhancedMessage"],
      },
    }]
  ]
}

Why?

This aims to solve this ongoing issue for react-intl: Rich text formatting and translations

The translator shouldn't need to worry about "email" is a hyperlink in the UI, and I don't want to limit support to just HTML

So…

  • do you use react-intl?
  • do you like rich text formatting for translated messages?
  • do you want this to be as easy as possible for the developer and the translator?

→ Then this library might be just right for you 🥳

However it's as simple as it gets and only makes simplest replacements of values. So there's no support for nested elements or other fancy stuff. (yet?)

Usage

import { FormattedEnhancedMessage } from 'react-intl-enhanced-message'

const Component = () => (
  <FormattedEnhancedMessage
    id="greeting"
    defaultMessage="Hello <x:strong>{user}</x:strong>!"
    values={{ user: 'Dan' }}

    // enhancements in: 3, 2, 1…
    enhancers={{
      strong: user => <strong>{user}</strong>
    }}
  >
)

This will result in following HTML:

Hello <strong>Dan</strong>!

FormattedEnhancedMessage

This component accepts all properties as FormattedMessage from react-intl with the following exceptions:

  • children: Has no effect
  • tagName: Has no effect

However it adds following property:

  • enhancers: Expects an object

The translated messages can have HTML/JSX like 'tags' to indicate that the content should be replaced by an enhancer function.

As suggested in the linked issue, every tag starts with the namespace 'x', e.g. like <x:sth>.

To illustrate this, see the following example:

const enhancers = {
  // Will replace anything between <x:em> and </x:em>
  em: emphasized => <strong>{emphasized}</strong>,
  // Will replace anything between <x:italic> and </x:italic>
  italic: italic => <i>{italic}</i>,
}

const translation = `
Good <x:em>morning</x:em> <x:italic>Dan</x:italic>!
We hope you have a <x:em>beautiful</x:em> day so far.

<x:em><x:italic>Only the outer 'tag' would be replace correctly here.</x:italic></x:em>

<x:unknown>This will be left untouched as there is no enhancer registered for unknown.</x:unknown>
`

GitHub