Atomic State

An experimental state managment library I’m working on as a side project:)

Currently, this works for any React application (native or web), but persistence only works in the web, if you are using React Native, you’ll have to implement your own persistence method:)

How does it work?

You can have your state(s), or atoms (yes, like Recoil), separated from your components, in different modules, etc.

Creating an atom

The createAtom creates a state that can be used by different components, and will be in sync across them (and can be updated by them)

(You don’t need to use a Context).

First:

npm install --save atomic-state

or

yarn add --save atomic-state

Then

import { createAtom, useAtom } from "atomic-state";

For example:

const EMAIL = createAtom({
  /* the name of the atom */
  name: "email-state",
  /* default value */
  default: "",
  /* if true, this atom's value will be saved to localStorage */
  localStoragePersistence: true,
  /* custom methods for updating the state of this atom, or just running some code */
  actions: {
    /*
        Actions take one param with three properties:
        'args' - The only param passed when calling the action
        'state' - Current state
        'dispatch' - Function to update the state
        For example, this changes the case of this atom's value.
        */
    changeCase({ args, state, dispatch }) {
      dispatch((email) =>
        args.type === "uper" ? email.toUpperCase() : email.toLowerCase()
      );
    },
  },
});

Using an atom

You’ve created your first aesthetic atom 🎉
Let’s use it.

You have your app, your main component, you can use an atom in a similar way than with useState, using the useAtom hook.

useState returns two items, the state, and the function to update it.

useAtom returns three items, the first two are just like in a normal useState call, the third item is the actions object of that atom (except it’s not, you can only pass one argument to these actions, and that will become the args property of the action).

Take a look:

import { createAtom, useAtom } from "atomic-state";

const EMAIL = createAtom({
  name: "email-state",
  default: "",
  localStoragePersistence: true,
  actions: {
    changeCase({ args, state, dispatch }) {
      dispatch((email) =>
        args.type === "upper" ? email.toUpperCase() : email.toLowerCase()
      );
    },
  },
});

const EmailForm = ({ onEmailChange }) => {
  const [email, setEmail, actions] = useAtom(EMAIL);
  useEffect(() => {
    onEmailChange(email);
  }, [email]);
  return (
    <div>
      <h3>{email}</h3>
      <input
        value={email}
        onChange={(e) => {
          setEmail(e.target.value);
        }}
      />
      <br />
      <button onClick={() => actions.changeCase({ type: "upper" })}>
        Uppercase
      </button>
      <button onClick={() => actions.changeCase({ type: "meh" })}>
        Lowercase
      </button>
    </div>
  );
};

export default function App() {
  const onEmailChange = (email) => {
    console.log(email);
  };
  console.log("Main tree was rendered");
  return (
    <div>
      <EmailForm onEmailChange={onEmailChange} />
    </div>
  );
}

Getting specific atom items

(New) If you wan to use only the atom’s value, you can use the useAtomValue hook, which returns the atom value

So, instead of:

const [value] = useAtom(atom);

You would do:

const value = useAtomValue(atom);

Same with your atom’s actions, and the dispatcher that sets the atoms value.

So it will be something like this

Before (still works the exact same way)

const [value, dispatch, actions] = useAtom(atom);

After (if you don’t want to be destructuring the value, the dispatcher or the actions, and only need one of them)

const value = useAtomValue(atom);
const dispatch = useAtomDispatch(atom);
const actions = useAtomActions(atom);

Updating a component that uses an atom will only update that component’s React tree, and other components subscribed to that atom’s state.

That’s basically it:)

GitHub

https://github.com/danybeltran/atomic-state